National American Business Women’s Day: These Days Women Just Know They Can

By Donna St. Jean Conti

“Women’s Lib? Oh, I’m afraid it doesn’t interest me one bit.
I’ve been so liberated it hurts.” — Lucille Ball

Established in 1949, American Business Women’s Day is observed on September 22 as the first annual event was held on September 22, 1982. It was officially recognized by congressional proclamation in 1983 and again in 1986. It is a day set aside to honor and reflect upon the contributions and accomplishments of the millions of women in the workforce as well the millions of women business owners in the United States. Within this workforce are vast numbers of marketing professionals. In fact, marketing and especially public relations (PR) are fields in which women have truly thrived and now dominate.

Communicators and Team Players

The numbers of American women in the labor force have grown from 37% in 1962 to 61% in 2000 according to this article by National Day Archives.[1] The same article also mentions that as of 2018, “there are 9.1 million businesses owned by women throughout the nation.”[2] One field that especially showcases this climb in numbers is that of public relations, where 59% of PR management roles and 63% of PR specialist positions are held by women according to the article, “Why are there More Women than Men in PR?,” by Everything-PR.[3]

The reason for these numbers has been hypothesized to be that women tend to collaborate more and prefer to work in teams whereas men preferred to be in more competitive fields such as journalism.[4] The article also surmises that women prefer to stay out of fields such as journalism due to the high level of competition with little compensation.[5] However, there is no concrete explanation as to why women dominate the PR industry.

Who Started This Day & Why?

The American Business Women’s Association, a professional network for women in business and women business owners, is responsible for starting American Business Women’s Day.[6] The organization was started to “bring together businesswomen of diverse occupations and to provide opportunities for them to help themselves and others grow personally and professionally through leadership; education, networking support and national recognition,” and though there is no counterpart day for American businessmen, it is important to note that the day was not created to disregard men’s accomplishments, rather to bring to light women’s.[7] The site, The BalanceCareers provides more information about the American Business Women’s Association and provides some interesting profiles and stories in its article, “FAQs About American Business Women’s Day.”[8]

How to Celebrate American Business Women’s Day

Celebrating this day is simple: just show appreciation for your female colleagues through simple gestures. The article from the National Day Archives makes a few suggestions. My favorite is to ask a female colleague about her journey to where she is now, the obstacles she had to overcome, and about her mentors and advocates that helped her along the way.[9] If you decide to celebrate this day on social media, consider using the hashtag #AmericanBusinessWomensDay.

Reading about National American Business Women’s Day got me thinking about how fortunate I have been in business. I shared some of my thoughts when St. Conti Communications celebrated 20 years in business.[10] It hasn’t always been easy, but it has made it possible for me to do so much. I was lucky to be encouraged at an early age to have my own business at a time when it wasn’t yet common; I’m happy that, these days, women just know they can, and the numbers prove it. Happy American Business Women’s Day!

 

 

[1] National Day Archives, “NATIONAL AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN’S DAY / SEP 22,” https://www.nationaldayarchives.com/day/national-american-business-womens-day/

[2] National Day Archives, “NATIONAL AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN’S DAY / SEP 22,” https://www.nationaldayarchives.com/day/national-american-business-womens-day/

[3] Everything-PR, “Why are there More Women than Men in PR?,” https://everything-pr.com/why-are-there-more-women-than-men-in-pr/.

[4] Everything-PR, “Why are there More Women than Men in PR?,” https://everything-pr.com/why-are-there-more-women-than-men-in-pr/.

[5] Everything-PR, “Why are there More Women than Men in PR?,” https://everything-pr.com/why-are-there-more-women-than-men-in-pr/.

[6] American Business Women’s Association, https://www.abwa.org/.

[7] American Business Women’s Association, https://www.abwa.org/.

[8] The BalanceCareers, “FAQs About American Business Women’s Day,” https://www.thebalancecareers.com/faqs-about-american-business-women-s-day-3515115.

[9] National Day Archives, “NATIONAL AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN’S DAY / SEP 22,” https://www.nationaldayarchives.com/day/national-american-business-womens-day/

[10] St. Conti Communciations, “DONNA ST. JEAN CONTI, REFLECTING ON 20 YEARS IN BUSINESS AND WHAT COMES NEXT,” https://stconticommunications.com/donna-st-jean-conti-reflecting-on-20-years-in-business-and-what-comes-next/.

 

Donna St. Jean Conti is president of St. Conti Communications, an award-winning, full-service, marketing communications agency specializing in public relations, social media, and writing support. We are based in Mission Viejo, Calif. For more information about our agency and how we can help you, contact Donna St. Jean Conti, APR, at dconti (at) stconticommunications.com.

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